Why I was wrong about Scrum + “Hard Goals”

I am so happy to admit to you that I made a mistake.

I thought reaching the goal was the most important thing. “Isn’t that what Scrum is all about?” (I thought). I used to value making sure my team’s completed point values looked good at the end of the sprint. I thought pushing them to produce work would be more helpful so they learned how to commit to a goal. But sometimes that attitude of mine simply encouraged the developers to produce code that either they weren’t personally proud of or that I sure as heck wasn’t happy with when it came to the code review. So what was the value of making it to the goal line if the ball is busted and deflated when it whizzes past?

Keep reading to learn why admitting your mistakes in not only ”okay” but also possibly the most productive thing you can do.

How Charles Dickens Wrote Like An Agile Programmer

Ever feel like you have to finish the whole project before releasing it?

Humbug.

By mining an unlikely source, I will show you why these “all or nothing” thoughts are hindering your success. We can observe Charles Dickens’ release process and prove how iterative releases allowed for quick learning and better results for the user.

Fixing Bad Habits By Learning To Love Them: Agile Retrospectives

Have you ever slipped? Were you seeing positive progress with your Agile team at work only to watch them suddenly return to bad habits? It’s gonna happen. Even when you know the path to success, you and your team are going to backslide into the old behaviors that caused the initial grief. I can imagine it now–someone saying, “Hey! I thought we had a meeting where we agreed to stop doing those things!” Don’t let yourself or your peers make you feel bad for simply being human. I’m excited to share one of my favorite Buddhist stories about self-care which will help you to improve yourself in a healthy way.

Samsara: 5 Agile Techniques to End Suffering And Increase Learning

Cycles, sprints, iterations… these are all buzzwords that the software process community has been using for years. Most of these words were design to help us “fail fast and fail often” so that we can learn more about how our users feel about the stuff we’ve coded. But have these words really helped us? Sadly, for many software developers, these words are empty. We’ll attempt to reinvigorate of these buzzwords (like “sprints” or Agile cycles) by analyzing one of the oldest words in human history: “samsara.”